Not Just a Holiday

A uniquely American holiday, this "Thanksgiving." In 2019 America, the last Thursday in November in the United States is set aside for food, family, and these days, football. But more than 400 years ago, stories of the "first Thanksgivings" in North America tell very different tales. The remaining Mayflower settlers celebrated surviving of a harrowing…

When I Grow Up

One of the greatest blessings of a long morning commute in the car is the opportunity to listen the the preaching of the late Dr. Adrian Rogers on his ministry's broadcast, Love Worth Finding. While every morning's sermon is uplifting, yesterday's stopped me in my tracks. In this particular sermon, Dr. Rogers quoted a list…

Priorities

It's fall, y'all! And this time of year, and in this part of the U.S., people celebrate the crisp, cool mornings and the warm, dry afternoons with weekend crafts festivals of all types. And among the wonderful finds at these festivals are various decorations that celebrate our Christian faith. Many are poignant and thought-provoking, some…

Truth Never Changes

The eagle pictured above may not be real, but it's an amazing (and ginormous) metal representation of a bald eagle captured in mid-flight at the Dollywood theme park in Sevierville, Tennessee. Every bald eagle I see reminds me of my favorite verse from the beautiful, lyrical book of Isaiah. But those who wait on the…

Loving the Wartzenalls

My first guest blogger (ever) is Mitch Teemley. He’s a Christ follower, a filmmaker, and a story teller extraordinaire. The daily posts on his blog “The Power of Story,” whether inspirational (like this one) or just plain funny, combine hilarious visuals with outstanding writing, and they always make me smile. I know they’ll make you smile, too! I definitely recommend following Mitch!

Mitch Teemley

Dysfunctional-families-roles-created

Family. A mixture of people we get and don’t get. People we like, and people we would never have chosen to be with if we had a choice. But we don’t. Because they’re family. Right?

I haven’t seen my cousin Ralph in 50 years. The moment he hit his teens he chose to stop attending family gatherings. Why? His sister tells me it’s because he feels he has nothing in common with any of us; we’re just a bunch of strangers he was randomly thrown together with at birth. Funny thing is, before he disappeared, Ralph was the only person in the family I related to; he was the person most like me. 

I was a smidge more loyal. I never actually stopped attending family gatherings. However, by the time I was a teenager I’d decided my friends, the people I chose, were far more important than a random…

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